Blog

Talking Turkey: How much does it cost to cook your Thanksgiving dinner?

Here’s something Walton Gas customers can be thankful for this holiday season: Those priceless memories created around the Thanksgiving table with family and friends come at a low cost. The natural gas energy it takes to cook a holiday meal for 12 guests costs about 42 cents.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture says you should cook a thawed stuffed turkey of regular size for 4-4.5 hours. The cost of natural gas needed to operate an oven set at 350 degrees for one hour is about 6¢. So a turkey roasted for four hours costs about 24¢ in natural gas.

The cooking costs breakdown for your Thanksgiving meal:

  • Roast stuffed turkey cooked 4.5 hours: 24¢
  • Large pan of mashed potatoes cooked for 20 minutes: less than 2¢.
  • Giblet gravy cooked on the stove for 10 minutes: less than 1¢.
  • Homemade dinner rolls baked for 30 minutes: 3¢.
  • Vegetable casserole cooked for 1 hour: 6¢.
  • Two baked pumpkin pies: 6¢

TOTAL: 42¢

Cooking Smart

Walton Gas offers these tips to get even more energy value while cooking your holiday meal:

  • Use glass and ceramic dishes. They hold heat well and allow you to lower the oven temperature by 25 degrees.
  • Cooking turkey in a roasting bag can reduce cooking time by nearly half.
  • Keep the oven door closed. The temperature drops 25-75 degrees each time the oven door is opened, so monitor cooking time and peek through the oven window, if possible, to check on your food.
  • Plan to bake more than one dish or cook an entire meal in the oven to save energy.

Did you know?

  • Americans eat 46 million turkeys at Thanksgiving, according to the National Turkey Federation. Another 22 million are eaten at Christmas.
  • 34% of Thanksgiving meals are cooked in gas-powered ovens.
  • Butterball’s Turkey Talk-Line, which the company has operated since 1981, employs 50+ experts who answer more than 100,000 questions each November and December.
  • You can talk turkey with a Butterball expert by calling 1-800-BUTTERBALL (1-800-288-8372). The company’s experts also answer questions via Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Instagram, live chat, text and email.

Do I Really Need a Furnace Inspection Every Fall?

4 Good Reasons You Should Say ‘YES’ to an Annual Checkup

Most Walton Gas customers know that an annual furnace checkup is recommended, but very few actually take it seriously. Most put off calling a professional Georgia heating and air conditioning contractor until they wake up in a cold house one morning.

Natural gas furnace maintenance is necessary — and now is the time to do it. Before the cold weather hits, have your furnace serviced to keep it in good running order so it won’t conk out when you need it most.

Fall inspections are recommended during the months of October, November and December.

Fall Inspections are recommended during the months of October, November and December. Right now, many contractors are providing incentive pricing to encourage you to get an affordable tune-up instead of waiting until your furnace needs (yikes!) costly repairs.

A well-maintained furnace lasts much longer, which means you’ll get the most out of your investment. Still not convinced? Walton Gas provides these 4 additional good reasons for making an annual furnace checkup part of your fall routine.

1. Save money on repairs and replacements.

Would you operate your car without ever changing the oil? Of course not! The car would break down, and you’d likely pay dearly to get it fixed. After doing this a few times, you’d definitely need a new car since the number of breakdowns would quickly reduce the car’s lifespan.

That’s what it’s like when you fail to properly maintain your furnace. Not only will you be paying more on repairs, but you’ll need a furnace far sooner than you expected—and furnaces aren’t cheap!

2. Save money through energy efficiency.

Heating makes up about 29% of your energy bill, according to ENERGY STAR. That adds up, especially if we have a particularly long cold snap in Georgia this winter.

Your furnace has dozens of crucial parts that need to be professionally tuned-up and cleaned. This proactive step ensures your furnace is working at optimum efficiency, providing you with the most heat for the least cost.

3. Protect against health and safety risks.

Annual furnace maintenance helps to keep you and your family safe. Technicians say a furnace inspection can reveal carbon monoxide leaks, which are hard to detect because the gas is colorless and odorless. Carbon monoxide can lead to headaches, dizziness, nausea and even death. In the U.S., nearly 500 people die each year, and 15,000 people are taken to emergency rooms, because of exposure.

4. Maintain the manufacturer’s warranty.

Check your furnace’s warranty to see what the manufacturer requires to honor it. It’s likely that professional preventative maintenance is expected.

If there’s ever a day when you do need to cash in on that warranty, the manufacturer is going to ask for service records to prove that you’ve been taking care of it. If you haven’t, expect to pay out of your own pocket for costly repairs.

Don’t let a furnace failure leave you in the cold this winter. Along with raking leaves, putting away lawn furniture and stocking up on Halloween candy, make furnace maintenance a part of your fall routine.


Do you know a low-income senior who needs help
to repair a natural gas furnace?

When a gas furnace stops working, it’s a crisis for some elderly Walton Gas customers. HopeWorks Emergency Low-Income Program for Seniors  (H.E.L.P.S.), sponsored by Walton EMC and Atlanta Gas Light, provides a way to repair furnaces at no cost to qualifying low-income senior homeowners.

To qualify for assistance, individuals must be at least 65 years old and living in a home they own. Other program and financial guidelines also apply. 

For information or to apply: Visit www.hopeworks4us.org or call 404-872-0167.

Dawgs Win, Charities Score!

Vote now for your favorite.

The 2018 college football season is underway — and Georgia Bulldogs fans couldn’t be happier with how things are going. There are reasonable expectations that another Eastern Division championship is coming to Athens. And there are optimistic whispers of even bigger things to come before the post-season wraps.

But die-hard Dawg fans aren’t the only ones happily counting the numbers in the win column. Walton Gas customers as well as those who benefit from the work of three Georgia organizations are keeping close tabs, too.

Walton Gas is donating money to
Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta, The Salvation Army and
Camp Twin Lakes for every game the Bulldogs win this season.

Through it's Champions for Charity program, Walton Gas and its customers are donating money to Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta, The Salvation Army and Camp Twin Lakes for every game the Bulldogs win this season. The company is donating $1,000 for every regular season victory. Plus, Walton Gas adds another $5,000 to the total if the Bulldogs win a bowl game.

Last year, Walton Gas donated $50,000 that was divided among the three organizations. Since 2013, when the program started, Walton Gas and its customers have contributed more than $175,000 to the charities that collectively benefit thousands of Georgians each year.

More than $175,000 has been donated to charities
that collectively benefit thousands of Georgians each year.

In 2017, Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta received a check for $27,000 for receiving the most votes and matching contributions from new Walton Gas customers. The Salvation Army was presented a $13,000 donation, and Camp Twin Lakes received $10,000.

On Nov. 11 when the Bulldogs host Auburn at Sanford Stadium, Walton Gas officials will join representatives of the three charities to present this year’s checks. If you’re at the game, keep an eye out for the on-field presentation of the donations during pre-game activities. Or, check the Walton Gas website the following Monday to learn which organization took home the biggest check this year. 

Choose your charity 

While every organization is a winner in Champions for Charity, it’s up to Walton Gas customers to determine which organization will collect the most money. Voting for the checks that will be presented during the 2019 season is now underway. To help you choose, here is some information about each organization.

Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta (CHOA)

From life-saving pediatric cancer treatments and organ transplants to fracture care and appendectomies, the not-for-profit CHOA is meeting the medical needs of Georgia’s children and teens. U.S. News and World Report ranks it as one of the nation’s top pediatric hospitals.

In 2017, more than 390,000 sick or injured children
received care at CHOA.

In 2017, more than 390,000 sick or injured children received care at CHOA. Its new Center for Advanced Pediatrics, which opened in July, is expected to welcome more than 100,000 patient visits per year.

All this care comes at a hefty price tag. The daily cost to operate all of CHOA’s hospitals is nearly $4 million. Donations like those made by Walton Gas provide amenities that aren’t covered by the operations budget.

With the $27,000 CHOA received from Walton Gas last year, the hospital could buy 13 wheelchairs for patients or eight special gliders where parents can sit and cuddle infants in the neonatal intensive care unit. The donation was also enough to purchase 54 iPads to entertain children while they are undergoing radiology treatments, plus 20 music soothers for infant cribs and also 100 sets of supplies that allow patients and their medical team to celebrate when something extraordinary happens.

The Salvation Army

The Salvation Army offers prevention, refuge and stability to men, women and families who find themselves without shelter due to personal and financial circumstances.

In metro Atlanta, three shelters offer 500 beds to individuals in need. The shelters also provide meals, laundry, rehabilitation and spiritual counseling. During times of natural disaster, such as hurricanes and flooding, Salvation Army units are deployed to provide food services and care to those in crisis.

Walton Gas’s $13,000 donation was enough
to provide a bed in a shelter for 390 nights this year.

The Salvation Army’s homelessness prevention program includes housing for low-income elderly, handicapped and disabled persons. The charity’s Veterans on the Move program is a three-month residential substance abuse program for homeless veterans with an honorable discharge. There are also residential recovery programs for individuals battling addiction and sex trafficking victims.

Walton Gas’s $13,000 donation was enough to provide a bed in a shelter for 390 nights this year.

Camp Twin Lakes

Georgia’s Camp Twin Lakes is one of only a handful of camps in the nation designed exclusively for children with extraordinary medical needs. The camp serves children with a range of serious illnesses and special needs, from cancer and diabetes to kidney disorders, asthma and burn injuries.

Each year, some 10,000 campers spend time at one of the Twin Lakes campsites (Rutledge, Winder, Warm Springs) or participate in its day camp program at children’s hospitals. The camp offers medically intensive services such as chemotherapy and dialysis as well as wheelchair accessible outdoor recreation and lodging.

With the help of donors like Walton Gas, Camp Twin Lakes
subsidizes 70% of the cost of each camper.

With the help of donors like Walton Gas, Camp Twin Lakes subsidizes 70% of the cost of each camper. More than 70% of all campers attend camp at no cost to their family.

A $10,000 donation by Walton Gas sponsors 20 campers for a week of camp, or it can provide outdoor adventure programs such as horseback riding and rock climbing for 36 camper cabins. The donation can also fund 10 day camps at Georgia children’s hospitals. 

Promoting Georgia pride on a rainy day

New and renewing Walton Gas customers receive a free umbrella as thanks. But it’s not just any umbrella. Sure, the bright blue exterior emblazoned with the Walton Gas logo may look like the average, water-repelling, rainy-day gear. But pop it open and you’ll find a delightful surprise: a photographic mural featuring five iconic scenes from around the Peach State.

The unusual umbrella has garnered raves from recipients as well as awards for its unusual design. Even better, the umbrella is a great conversation starter. The next time it’s raining, put up your Walton Gas umbrella and show your Georgia pride with these fun facts.

Forsyth Park Fountain in Savannah

Mention the ironwork in Georgia’s oldest city and ornamental balconies and fences may first come to mind. Most don’t realize that Savannah’s best-known landmark, the iconic fountain in Forsyth Park, is also a work in iron. Built in 1858, the ornate, cast iron fountain is the park’s centerpiece. When the fountain was first turned on, citizens in attendance quickly found themselves soaked when water spouted from the four triton figures with too much vigor. A much larger basin had to be constructed to catch the spray. The fountain’s characteristic spray effect didn't exist until 1873 when a recirculator was installed as a water conservation measure.

Atlanta Skyline

With 56 buildings rising at least 330 feet in height, Atlanta ranks seventh among U.S. skylines. Boasting a distinctive gold, glowing crown, the Bank of America Plaza on Peachtree Street is the tallest at 1,023 feet and 55 stories. Nine of the city’s 10 tallest buildings are on Peachtree Street; the exception is Buckhead’s Sovereign building on, appropriately, Peachtree Road. The Westin Peachtree Plaza (number 5 on the list) was the tallest hotel in the world when it was completed in 1976. Its 72 floors are the most of any building in the city.

Tybee Island Lighthouse

Georgia’s oldest and tallest lighthouse is properly called the Tybee Island Light Station. In fact, though, there was no light in the first structure built in 1736 to guide mariners into the entrance of the Savannah River. At 90 feet tall, the day-mark (a lighthouse with no light) was the tallest structure of its kind in America at the time. After storms and an eroding beach destroyed two day-marks, a 100-foot tall brick and wood structure was constructed in 1773. It was lit with candles for the first time in 1791, making it a true lighthouse. The top 40 feet of the structure had to be rebuilt following the Civil War, but the remainder of today’s building dates back to the first true lighthouse.

North Georgia Mountains

Scientists believe the mountains in the state’s northeast corner — at the southern end of the Appalachian Trail — are over 1 billion years old. Visitors come by the thousands each year to enjoy the area’s rugged, natural beauty that includes Brasstown Bald. At 4,784 above sea level, it’s the tallest point in Georgia. A seasonal shuttle takes visitors to the top where they can view miles of the 750,000-acre Chattahoochee National Forest, as well as the Carolinas and Tennessee. The North Georgia mountains are also home to Amicola Falls, the largest cascading waterfall east of the Mississippi River.

Georgia Agriculture

Agriculture is the state’s oldest and largest industry. It has played a dominant role in Georgia's economy since English colonists settled here in 1733. Today, agriculture contributes about $73 billion annually to the state’s economy, according to the UGA Center for Agribusiness & Economic Development. Georgia is perennially the number one state in the nation in the production of peanuts, broilers (chickens), pecans, blueberries and spring onions. At the last agricultural census, one in seven Georgians worked in agriculture, forestry or related fields. There were 42,257 farms in the state encompassing 9.6 million acres of land.

Get your Walton Gas Umbrella

Ready to show your Georgia pride on a rainy day? The Walton Gas umbrella is available only to new and renewing customers who lock in a 2-year low fixed rate. And here’s even better news: You’ll also receive a $25 bill credit. Sign up now!  

Walton Gas is Fighting Breast Cancer — One Clay Pigeon, One Step at a Time

More than 10,000 Georgians are diagnosed with breast cancer each year, according to the National Cancer Institute. With the help of area target shooting enthusiasts, Walton Gas is fighting breast cancer – one clay pigeon and one step at a time.

On Aug. 17, we were the presenting sponsor of the Walton EMC Charity Shoot 2018, which raised $16,700 to benefit local breast cancer organizations. To date, the annual event has raised a total of $120,000.

The event raised another $16,700

to benefit local breast cancer organizations.


The funds raised benefit numerous agencies that provide information and services to breast cancer patients. Every clay pigeon shot down during the Charity Shoot helps to fund free breast health education, screening, examinations, mammograms, ultrasounds and biopsies as well as assistance to individuals who are financially challenged by a cancer diagnosis.

A Shout-Out to Shooters

This year’s contest attracted 33 teams, bringing together 165 individual competitors. Among them was Buddy Johnson, a member of the Southern Sanitation team that claimed first overall. Buddy has participated in the competition every year and says everything about the event is “first class.”

Vickie Rollins of Statham has participated since we started a ladies division three years ago. Not only is she winning in life as a breast cancer survivor, but she’s also a sharp shooter who has won the ladies’ division every year.

Be sure to see the complete list of winners at the end of this post. Congratulations to every winner and all the competitors for helping us shoot down cancer.

As the presenting sponsor, Walton Gas provides funds

as well as manpower for the Charity Shoot.

Making it happen

As the presenting sponsor, Walton Gas provides funds as well as manpower for the event. Without the behind-the-scenes work of many Walton employees and their families, the Charity Shoot would not be possible.

Before the big day, Walton office employees manage registration and put together goody bags and snack bags for participants. Meanwhile, others handle logistics such as setting up the shooting stations, putting out tents and signs and filling coolers.

An army of employees are on hand the day of the event to register arriving teams, sell raffle tickets, work at the shooting stations and keep score — whatever is needed to ensure participants have a good time. And when the competition ends, shooters head back to the gun club pavilion for a BBQ chicken lunch prepared by Walton employees who started cooking before most got out of bed that morning.

Next up: Georgia 2-Day Walk for Breast Cancer

Though we’ve closed the books on another successful Charity Shoot, the active community caring by Walton Gas employees doesn’t stop there. It’s just one of the many hands-on community activities we are actively engaged in as a company throughout the year.

Walton Gas is a sponsor of the Georgia 2-Day Walk

for Breast Cancer, Sept. 29-30.
 

Next for us is the 16th Annual Georgia 2-Day Walk for Breast Cancer, Sept. 29-30. Walton Gas is proud to be a sponsor of this event that funds grants that provide breast cancer education, screening, early detection, support services and continuing care for Georgians.

Earlier this year, Walton Gas helped those affected by breast cancer as the official rebranding sponsor for the Georgia 2-Day Walk for Breast Cancer (formerly named the Atlanta 2-Day Walk for Breast Cancer). We designed a new logo and helped to introduce the event’s new name in January.

Walton employees are also stepping up for the cause. Several have been training to participate in the 30-mile walk that runs around and through metro Atlanta. Funds raised at the Charity Shoot will be donated by the team. If you’re in the area, keep a lookout for the hundreds participating in the event. If you see the Walton team, give them a wave and a shout.

We’re caring for the community — one shot, one step at a time. It’s simply the Walton Gas way of doing business.

RESULTS

Walton EMC Charity Shoot
Cherokee Rose Gun Club
Aug. 17, 2018

Class 1
1st place: Alex Doster, Monroe
2nd place: Jeff Brewer, McDonough

Class 2
1st place: Doug Ruark, Monroe
2nd place: Jere Rowe, Monroe

Class 3
1st place: James Brooks, Sandersville
2nd place: Chip Morrow, Braselton

High Individual Overall
Men: Barry Zuckerman, Roswell
Women: Vickie Rollins, Statham

Team – Men
1st place: Southern Sanitation
2nd place: Cobb EMC
3rd place: Jackson EMC

Team – Women
1st place: Coweta-Fayette EMC

A Better Way To Go

Natural Gas Vehicles

Natural Gas Vehicles Gaining in Popularity 

Gassing up the car is increasingly taking on new meaning in the Peach State and around the nation.

Use of natural gas for transportation is growing worldwide. In the next few years, North America is expected to see some of the fastest growth due to the fuel’s abundance and low cost here.

Up to now, Americans have been slow to adopt the natural gas vehicle (NGV) trend that has been popular in other natural gas-rich countries for several years. There are currently about 250,000 NGVs on the nation’s road today – less than 0.1% of total U.S. vehicles. Most of those are heavy- and medium-duty vehicles used as city transit buses, refuse trucks and delivery vans.

Sales of light-duty NGVs for personal transportation are on the upswing, however. U.S. carmakers are offering more natural gas-powered models. At the same time, refueling is becoming easier and more convenient as options for gassing up NGVs at home or at public stations increase throughout Georgia.

Natural Gas Vehicle FAQs

What is a natural gas vehicle?

A natural gas vehicle is designed to be environmentally and economically friendly. These vehicles can be powered by two forms of natural gas: compressed natural gas or liquid natural gas. Vehicles can either be dedicated to run on natural gas only, or a dual-fuel vehicle to run on gasoline and diesel as well.

How does a NGV compare to conventional vehicles?

The horsepower, acceleration and cruise speed of NGVs are comparable with those of equivalent conventional vehicles. Also, compared with conventional diesel and gasoline vehicles, NGVs offer other air-quality benefits.

What are the benefits of driving an NGV?

Fuel savings – The U.S. is a major producer of natural gas. This abundant domestic supply has driven down the price of natural gas, which typically keeps prices lower than that of oil or other alternative energy sources.

Environmental benefits – Some studies indicate they produce up to 90% fewer emissions than conventional fuels and reduce greenhouse gases 20-29% over diesel and gasoline.

Reduced maintenance costs – In some cases, oil change intervals for NGVs may be extended since natural gas burns cleaner than gasoline or diesel. Also, because natural gas engines have practically no carbon build-up, it is not uncommon for them to last longer than gasoline and diesel engines.

How long have NGVs been around?

The use of natural gas as a vehicle fuel in Italy in the 1930s, followed by New Zealand in the 1980s. It has been used as a fuel for U.S. fleet vehicles for more than a decade.

Where are NGVs more commonly driven?

The U.S. trails behind many other countries in its use of natural gas-powered vehicles. Worldwide, there were about 24.5 million NGVs by 2016, led by China (5 million), Iran (4 million), India and Pakistan (3 million), and Argentina (2.2 million). Brazil and Italy also have more than 1 million each on their roads.

Where can I buy an NGV?

Honda, GM and Dodge are currently manufacturing NGV sedans and pickup trucks for personal transportation. Check with local dealers for pricing and options. There are also a number of conversion options for light-duty vehicles.

If I buy an NGV, where can I refuel it?

There are more than 20 public alternative fuel stations in Georgia — most of them in and around Atlanta. Refer to the U.S. Department of Energy’s Alternative Fuels Data Center for the locations of natural gas refueling stations in Georgia and throughout the U.S.

NGV owners also have the option of purchasing their own refueling appliance, which provides the convenience of gassing up right in their own driveway. Walton Gas customers can have these appliances connected to the existing natural gas line at your house. Many say they are as easy and safe to operate as a gas range.

Learn More About Natural Gas Vehicles

U.S. Department of Energy Alternative Fuels Data Center

5 Reasons the Professionals Love Cooking with Gas

Cooking with gas
Have you been binge watching Food Network in search of a fabulous Valentine’s Day meal idea? A great recipe is certainly important, but how you cook it matters too, say professional chefs.

In a survey conducted among 100 professional chefs across the U.S., 96 reported that they prefer using a gas range for heir culinary creations. Walton Gas shares these five reasons the professionals love cooking with natural gas.

1. Fast Start

You can whip up a meal in a hurry because gas burners reach the correct temperature immediately when ignited. “Plus the change in heat levels is instantaneous,” says Christopher Kimball, founder and host of America’s Test Kitchen. Preparing a meal faster means you’ll use less energy, too.

2. Quick Cool

Gas burners cool quickly, allowing you to take a rolling boil down to a simmer in no time flat. This ensures that delicate dishes, like sauces, aren’t spoiled by a slow response time. A fast cool-down can mean the difference between a perfect, creamy consistency and a runny failure.

3. Greater Control

Seventy-two percent of the professional chefs surveyed cited greater control over temperature as one of the primary reasons for their preference. “Gas tends to have many settings, because you can turn the control knobs in tiny increments,” says chef Bruce Mattel, senior associate dean for culinary arts at the Culinary Institute of America. Patterned after models prized by professional chefs, today’s residential gas ranges offer super-low simmer settings among many features.

4. Even Heat Distribution

The flames on a gas cooktop are central so they heat pans evenly.  There are no cool spots that result in undercooking or hot spots to cause scorching.

5. Economical

Cooking with natural gas is economical. Most new models of natural gas cooking equipment use an electronic spark ignition, rather than a continuously burning pilot. This saves as much as 30 percent on energy costs.

You don’t have to be a professional to cook like one. This Valentine’s Day, whip up your famous beef Bourguignon or try out that new recipe for paella on a natural gas range — just like the pros. 

January Deep Freeze Results in Higher Energy Bills

Snow in Atlanta

Frigid air from waves of Arctic cold fronts will cause consumers to take notice when they receive energy bills for January.

The average high temperature for the first 18 days of the month was only 45 degrees, about 10 degrees cooler than normal. The lowest temperature during the same period was 14 degrees, with 12 of 18 mornings being below 26 degrees. The average low is 31.

That means it took a lot of heat to stay warm. The first 18 days of January required more than twice as much heating as the same time period in 2017.

That also means heating systems ran twice as much, sometimes for hours on end, causing consumers' energy bills to increase significantly. That's true no matter what fuel source - electricity, natural gas or LP gas - the heating system uses.

"Consumers should not be surprised when their energy bill covering January is up significantly," said Greg Brooks, Walton EMC spokesperson. "Heating costs may be double of what they were last year."

For electricity, heating can be as much as 60 percent of the total bill. For natural and LP gas, that figure could rise to as much as 80 to 100 percent.

Here are some tips to take a bite out of the Arctic chill:

  • Make sure your home is properly insulated and weather stripped. The most cost-effective place to add more insulation is the attic. Caulking gaps in the outside of your home is also an economical energy fix.
  • Open blinds and drapes facing south during the day to take advantage of solar heating.
  • Keep exterior doors closed as much as possible.
  • Wear heavier clothing indoors, like a jogging suit or thermal underwear and socks. That allows you to keep the thermostat at a lower temperature. Every degree lower can save three to five percent in heating costs.
  • Help your heating system run more efficiently. Change filters regularly and don't block vents with furniture or rugs.
  • Sign up for Walton EMC's and Walton Gas's levelized billing program. These programs shift some of the cost of higher months to lower months, making your bill a more even amount year-round.

Get Grillin’ for a Super Shindig

Chicken Wings Score for the BIG Game

Super Bowl Wings

Here in Georgia, it seems we can’t get enough of football. That’s why it’s a sure bet that many Walton Gas customers will join about a third of the nation’s population — an estimated 115 million people — to watch Super Bowl LII on Feb. 4. For many, though, the day’s gridiron matchup in Minneapolis will play second string to the real star of the game... food.

Football fans will nosh their way through the game at more than 25 million Super Bowl parties this year, a National Retail Federation study predicts. By the time the battle for the Vince Lombardi Trophy ends, party-goers will have packed away a feast amounting to the year’s second-highest food consumption day, topped only by Thanksgiving.

What’s on the menu at these super shindigs? Chicken wings — and lots of them! Last year, chicken wings eclipsed pizza as the most-consumed food during the game. The National Chicken Council estimates more than 1.33 billion wings will be gobbled on Super Bowl Sunday. That’s an average of four wings per American!


FUN FACT: 1.33 billion chicken wings weigh about 166 million pounds —338 times more than the combined weight of all 32 NFL teams.


That fowl fact is good news for the more than 100,000 Georgians employed in the poultry industry. Georgia leads all states in chicken production. Our state produces 26 million pounds of chicken each day, which amounts to a whopping 7 billion pounds annually. From farms to processing to allied industries, poultry packs a powerful economic punch, adding $38 billion to Georgia’s economy, according to the Georgia Poultry Federation.

Wing It!

Game day is synonymous with grilling for many. Super Bowl Sunday is the seventh most popular grilling day of the year. This year, you can get your grill on to make no-fuss, no-mess grilled chicken wings.

Here’s your Game Day Playbook for making these savory meat appetizers, according to the gas grilling experts at Char-Broil:

  1. Purchase about 5 pounds of wings, either whole or separated.

  2. Prep a baking sheet with two layers of aluminum foil. The first layer should fit the sheet tightly. The second should just lay on top of it.

  3. If you bought whole wings, cut them up into smaller pieces. You’ll be cutting through two joints. Cut through the joint that connects to the wing tip first. Discard the tip. Then cut the wing in half through the other joint, which is between the middle section and the drummette.

  4. Put the wings on the baking sheet and cover them with a light coating of oil. Season both sides with salt, pepper and onion powder.

  5. Preheat your gas grill to medium. Too much heat will char the outside of your wings while leaving the inside undercooked. Let the grill heat up for about 15 minutes. Discard the top layer of foil from the baking sheet.

  6. Now it’s time to cook the wings. Put them on the grill and reduce the burners to medium/medium-low.

  7. Cook the wings for about 20 minutes, turning them every 5 minutes. Check the internal temperature with a digital meat thermometer. Poultry needs to be cooked to 165°F.

  8. Remove the wings and place them on the baking sheet to rest.

  9. Once the wings have finished on the grill,  sauce them with different flavors — buffalo, barbecue, peachy mango jerk sauce. Simply toss the wings with your sauce in a large bowl. Then enjoy!

Get Cooking with Walton Gas

Each month, we feature a New Recipe Shared by a Walton Gas Customer in the Gasette newsletter. See what’s cooking at Walton Gas Recipes.

Going the Extra Mile

Walton Gas Powers Georgia 2-Day Walk for Breast Cancer

At Walton Gas, our employees are supporting breast health one step — one mile — at a time. A team representing our company and sister organization, Walton EMC, has walked in the 30-mile Georgia 2-Day Walk for Breast Cancer annually since 2010. Securing pledges for every mile completed, our Pink Power Teams have raised more than $200,000.

Walton Gas supplements our employees’ charitable efforts by sponsoring the annual fundraising event. That has added another $38,000 to money that It’s The Journey, producer of the Walk, can use to fund grants that pay for breast health and breast cancer programs throughout the state.


As a subsidiary of electric cooperative Walton EMC, caring for community is a natural part of who we are as a company.


Over the years, we’ve seen first hand how these grants benefit our customers and communities through breast health and breast cancer programs that focus on screening, diagnostics, genetic counseling and testing, support services and research in Georgia. So when Kim Goff, executive director of It’s The Journey, asked for our help with a special project last year, we enthusiastically agreed to go the extra mile.

New Name

What Kim needed was help launching the event’s new name. After 15 years at the Atlanta 2-Day Walk for Breast Cancer, it was being renamed the Georgia 2-Day Walk for Breast Cancer. Walton Gas stepped up as the official rebranding sponsor.

Walton Gas employees Savannah Chandler and Kathy Ivie were on hand at the walk’s 2017 closing ceremonies to help Kim and other volunteers unveil the refreshed name and a new logo.  

“We wanted the event name to better represent the scale of what we do and the fact that our grants serve people in over 100 counties in Georgia,” Kim said. Since 2003, the 2-Day Walk has raised more than $14 million and awarded 300 grants to breast cancer organizations in Georgia. 


More than 10,000 Georgians are diagnosed with breast cancer each year.National Cancer Institute


Two Days, 30 miles

The new name debuts with the 16th annual walk, which steps off on Sept. 29–30. Walkers will individually raise funds before striding through a 20-mile walk on Saturday and a 10-mile walk on Sunday. Members of Walton’s Pink Power team invite our customers and friends to join us as participants in this year’s event. Registration is now open at 2daywalk.org. All money raised by the Georgia 2-Day Walk for Breast Cancer stays in our local communities.